Is Bitcoin a Pyramid Scheme?. Cryptocurrencies are ...

Spanish Prosecution Office Investigating Alleged Bitcoin Pyramid Scheme: $1 Billion in Investor ... (current BTC/USD price is $10,604.80)

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Spanish Prosecution Office Investigating Alleged Bitcoin Pyramid Scheme: $1 Billion in Investor ...
Other Related Bitcoin Topics:
Bitcoin Price | Bitcoin Mining | Blockchain
The latest Bitcoin news has been sourced from the CoinSalad.com Bitcoin Price and News Events page. CoinSalad is a web service that provides real-time Bitcoin market info, charts, data and tools.
submitted by coinsaladcom to CoinSalad [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Jesus Roger Ver Says BTC Is Basically a Pyramid Scheme (current BTC/USD price is $8,799.46)

Latest Bitcoin News:
Bitcoin Jesus Roger Ver Says BTC Is Basically a Pyramid Scheme
Other Related Bitcoin Topics:
Bitcoin Price | Bitcoin Mining | Blockchain
The latest Bitcoin news has been sourced from the CoinSalad.com Bitcoin Price and News Events page. CoinSalad is a web service that provides real-time Bitcoin market info, charts, data and tools. Follow us on Twitter @CoinSalad.
submitted by coinsaladcom to CoinSalad [link] [comments]

11-16 13:53 - 'fair Bitcoin pyramid scheme to boost price' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/r0bo71c removed from /r/Bitcoin within 1-11min

'''
Hi, I have been stupid and while I new it is a pyramid scheme, I put few $ in couple of pyramid shemes/ponzi - and it collapse. Just hear me out please.
But that was only after I learned about bitcoin (when it was only 200$). Price didn't move for a while, so that's why I tarted to look in those ponzi things.
Anyway - after I joined ponzi, you need to recrut more people (obviously), so I started to preach and spam all my friends and whole internet. I intruduce so many people with bitcoin and crypocurrencies, which is a good thing, but ponzi was downside (luckily didn't recrute many people).
Just now, because of PlusToken, many more people found out about Bitcoin. But it was scam. What will hurt Bitcoin big time, when those bitcoins will be sold in markets.
So now, I am thinking, referral bonuses are not illigal, many companies are using more and more these tactics, to ask users (or youtubes, blogers) to market bussiness to more people, recrute them.
Could it be possible to code something like Bitcoin refferal program ? where you try to recrute, for example, 5 people, from who everyone is sending X amount of BTC to holding place, and they are giving something like 10% of their BTC away to you, and you get all that BTC (5* 10% of X) when you recrute all 5 of them. And person who invested bitcoin, gets his rest of 90% back when he recruts 5 new people and gets 10% of them. But if someone fails to recrute 5 people, he gets his 90% BTC back after Y amount of BTC mining blocks, and if he recrutet only 3 people, they could get back their BTC in full 100% and if they keep recruting, then those 10% from their 5 people.
If it is possibly to put it in code, like a law, could it work? Only risk is 10%, but gains are huge, easier to HOLD and possible to gain 50%, and amount of new people in Bitcoin will pump the price.
In this system, there is no central person, who can dissapier with BTC. It can stop for itself and no bitcoin will be lost.

What do you think about that?
'''
fair Bitcoin pyramid scheme to boost price
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: r0bo71c
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Bitcoin legacy chain is the biggest pyramid scheme ever made in history. Its price could get much higher before it falls apart. My reasons why.

Tl,dr: for the first time there is a scheme that 7 billions people can join. It isn't spatially restricted.
Here are my assumptions:
  1. Btc has no utility (you can argue store of value but that is bullshit and we all know it)
  2. Most people who buy in want fast return
  3. A significant share of People want to hodl
  4. Anyone on earth can join in.
  5. Fees make it impossible to transact
Disclaimer, assumption 1 and 5 are what set apart bch into the category of a currency.
First of all, any currency is by default a pyramid scheme, the only difference being that you are forced to use it. Sometime these schemes collapse and it can have terrible effects for the impacted population.
So what makes the difference between a "pyramid currency" and a functional one? Simple, it is its utility. Without the utility it is no different than owning a piece of art or a collectible (like a stamp). Collectible do have value and has such btc shouldn't ever go back to zero value. Per my first assumption, btc falls in that category because it has no utility. Now btc isn't your average collectible.
A collectible, like a painting by a famous painter, can increase significantly in value, it can even become "invaluable" (think the Mona Lisa where there is just not enough value out there to justify its trade). But people who put so much money in these collectibles do it for different reasons and NONE of them is "10% return within next month". This is the case for btc per my second assumption.
Now all the people doing just that and wanting fast return tend to not cash out their gains . Why? Because if you can make 10% in a month why not do nothing different and make another 10% within the next month? This is the basic reasoning of "hodling" or, in other words, brainless trading. By doing that, a hodler, is actively locking in capital for expectation of future gains. Per my assumption 3, a significant share of people are doing just that. Said behavior, contributes to reinforce assumption one that btc has no utility and is only a collectible.
Now the question is... Where are the future gains coming from?? They are simply coming from new comers, new people who want in on the fun of hodling magical internet money. How is that different from a pyramid scheme? Well it isn't and that's my point. We all know where it goes from there, at one point there aren't any more new comer and the whole thing collapses. How do we know for sure? Btc is indeed revolutionary but not THAT revolutionary. Pyramid schemes are as old as money and this isn't the first nor the last.
BUT it Might very well be the biggest ever in human history. Why? Because per my assumption 4, it is the first time that the audience of the scheme is that big. Anyone in almost any country can join in and that is a first. Because of that the pyramid can reach new heights that have never been seen before.
But harder will be the fall...
submitted by Azeroth7 to btc [link] [comments]

I'm interested in getting involved in bitcoin but I'm worried about shadowy figures altering the price at will leaving "smaller fish" the bottom feeders of a pyramid scheme.

Please change my view
submitted by LeakyPlumberCret to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Pyramid Scheme Allegedly Hoaxed $20 Billion In South Korea (current BTC/USD price is $8316.89)

Latest Bitcoin News:
Bitcoin Pyramid Scheme Allegedly Hoaxed $20 Billion In South Korea
Other Related Bitcoin Topics:
Bitcoin Price | Blockchain | ICOs
The latest Bitcoin news has been sourced from the CoinSalad.com Bitcoin Price and News Events page. CoinSalad is a web service that provides real-time Bitcoin market info, charts, data and tools. Follow us on Twitter @CoinSalad.
submitted by coinsaladcom to CoinSalad [link] [comments]

If you still think bitcoin is a pyramid or ponzi scheme simply because of the huge price moves, this analogy may help you understand.

The U.S. dollar is similar to Berkshire Hathaway stock (BRK.A (NYSE)) huge market cap, huge liquidity, percentage moves are minor.
Bitcoin is similar to a penny stock traded on pink sheets. Low market cap, low liquidity, percentage moves are huge.
But to take the analogy even further, we all know what happened to the share price of blockbuster as netflix rose to mainstream popularity.
submitted by slvbtc to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin legacy chain is the biggest pyramid scheme ever made in history. Its price could get much higher before it falls apart. My reasons why. /r/btc

Bitcoin legacy chain is the biggest pyramid scheme ever made in history. Its price could get much higher before it falls apart. My reasons why. /btc submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

I'm interested in getting involved in bitcoin but I'm worried about shadowy figures altering the price at will leaving "smaller fish" the bottom feeders of a pyramid scheme. /r/Bitcoin

I'm interested in getting involved in bitcoin but I'm worried about shadowy figures altering the price at will leaving submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

If you still think bitcoin is a pyramid or ponzi scheme simply because of the huge price moves, this analogy may help you understand. /r/Bitcoin

If you still think bitcoin is a pyramid or ponzi scheme simply because of the huge price moves, this analogy may help you understand. /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Same thing happening with DeFi right now...

Same thing happening with DeFi right now... submitted by Guarda-Wallet to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Buttcoin is an incredible scam

Buttcoin is an incredible scam
Honestly, the more I read into buttcoin the more sketchy and brilliant it comes across. The points have already been stated here (wanna buy some 1s and 0s with no intrinsic value, not protected by any financial institution, not backed by any government?) so I won't dwell on that. What I wanted to post about was how it's such an ingenious scam: a perpetual, decentralized, headless, slow-boil pyramid scheme.
A few frenzied libertarians and nerds sniffing their own farts put money into a genuine (if unscalable and inefficient) technology. This makes news, which attracts some speculators. Amount of money going in generates hype, more news, and brings in normies and more speculators. Value begins to go up, larger entities (companies/wealthy entrepreneurs) invest. Value goes up further. Pyramid reaches final stage as last wave of suckers buy bitcoin at ridiculous prices, convinced this slow, insecure, power-hungry, uninsured, volatile, awkward, unregulated digibuck is gonna replace existing financial systems that answer all bitcoin's shortcomings. The faster and savvy companies and entrepreneurs pull the rug out from the rest of the userbase and the pyramid collapses. Digibuck loses nearly all its value.
But, a few frenzied libertarians and nerds sniffing their own farts put money into...
Aaaaand on and on.
If you look back at the first time the pyramid collapsed, there was a decent progression until around September 2017 when things went fucking crazy leading to the massive price in December 2017, at which point the pyramid scheme winners took their cash and run. So, around three months.
People bought into the pyramid scheme again around March 2019, but were a bit more conservative - the price didn't shoot up nearly as high or as fast. Three months later, the pyramid started to topple again, but more slowly and not as devastatingly. It fluctuated after that until a low in March this year.
Since then people have been pumping money into the scheme. People are anticipating a big spike, I guess soon we will start to see a big influx of people because it's been "relatively stable" lately, with the pyramid people patiently waiting for a payoff rather than chipping away at the foundation. Of course, as soon as the spike happens it will be a massive plunge down as the pyramid collapses, similar to what we saw in Dec 2017.
But, it seems to be an unkillable scam. Even though there's nothing of actual value behind this con, it seems to have really good staying power because it is really hitting some powerful buttons in people's brains:
  • Get Rich Quick: Yes, even though it is a scam, there are going to be those successful few who walk away with other people's money. If people want to literally gamble by playing chicken with "currency" exchanges, then that's fine (maybe they'll even get luck and win big), but these people need to admit to themselves that bitcoin is only that - gambling. Not an asset, not a currency.
  • Ideology: It's not just your standard con, it's also bundled itself up with ideals and religiosity. It's an idea! The Internet of money! Libertarianism, utopia, revolution!
  • Technology: It comes with a veneer of authenticity because it has some real technology supporting it (even if the technology is just...not that great). People are really blown away when they hear vague descriptions of blockchain, words like "node" and "mining" and "private keys".
  • Hatred: Buttcoiners can be really motivated by hate and bitterness. Their hatred of "greedy banks" and "thieving governments" (legitimate or otherwise, your mileage may vary) seems to really move money.
  • Fear: If you don't invest in buttcoin, all the money in your bank account with inflate and wither away to nothing! Because inflation is real and not a fabricated boogeyman makes the scam seem more appealing.
In looking over those points, I'm not sure whether it's the technology or ideology that's what's really keeping people from seeing through this con.
I mean, anyone could start their own super-duper-coupon company that will only ever produce 21 million coupons. Ok, so the coupons are actually worthless, but if I tell people that one day everyone will use the coupons then suddenly they must have value right? Sounds ridiculous, but if I then say that the super-duper-coupon will be using revolutionary new digital protection, and be supported by a distributed database all over the world, and no government can forge or steal your coupons because of this new zipity-zoop-21 protocol I just developed, suddenly it sounds slightly more appealing.
Could just as easily be the ideology though that keeps this con running even after each blow. The amount of purple prose bullshit about freedom and brave new worlds and unlimited prosperity is just crazy.
Anyway, I've rambled enough, but wanted to get some thoughts out there after bitcoin enthusiast friends were encouraging me to invest and I did the research.
https://preview.redd.it/ucvix7hwwju51.jpg?width=500&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=220789d26b6f564783dbaef8044e88ca238f0f76
submitted by robanglican to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Buttmarketcap.com ignores extra 1.1x Billion Tether butts injected into organic market

What's a billion or so butts between friends?
Coinmarketcap is missing the extra 1.1x billion tethers that have been printed over the past few weeks by buttfinex during the crisis.
Number go back up! Organic growth! 'Stable asset confirmed!'
Lol
https://wallet.tether.to/transparency
https://stablecoinstats.com
I am so ready for the exit scam.
submitted by NumberOneButta to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://www.reddit.com/Scams/comments/jij7zf/the_blackmail_email_scam_part_6/
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Cartel scam
You will be threatened by scammers who claim to be affiliated with a cartel. They may send you gory pictures and threaten your life and the lives of your family. Usually the victim will have attempted to contact an escort prior to the scam, but sometimes the scammers target people randomly. If you are targeted by a cartel scam all you need to do is ignore the scammers as their threats are clearly empty.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
Craigslist Carfax/vehicle history scam
You'll encounter a scammer on Craigslist who wants to buy the vehicle you have listed, but they will ask for a VIN report from a random site that they have created and they will expect you to pay for it.
Double dip/recovery scammers
This is a scam aimed at people who have already fallen for a scam previously. Scammers will reach out to the victim and claim to be able to help the victim recover funds they lost in the scam.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam part 5: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5/
PSA: you did not win a giftcard: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/fffmle/psa_you_did_not_win_a_gift_card/
Sugar scams
Sugar scammers operate all over the internet and usually come in two varieties: advance-fee scams where the scammer will ask for a payment from you before sending you lots of money, and fake check style scams where the scammer will either pull a classic fake check scam, or will do a "bill pay" style scam that involves them paying your bills, or them giving you banking information to pay your bills. If you encounter these scammers, report their accounts and move on.
Google Hangouts
Google Hangouts is a messaging platform used extensively by all kinds of scammers. If you are talking with someone online and they want you to switch to Hangouts, they are likely a scammer and you should proceed with caution.
Publishers Clearing House scams
PCH scams are often advance-fee scams, where you will be promised lots of money after you make an initial payment. You will never need to pay if you win money from the real PCH.
Pet scams
You are looking for a specific breed of puppy, bird, or other pet. You come across a nice-looking website that claims to be breeding them and has some available right now - they may even be on sale! The breeders are not local to your area (and may not even list a physical location) but they assure you they can safely ship the pet to you after a deposit or full payment. If you go through with the payment, you will likely be contacted by the "shipper" who will inform you about an unexpected shipping/customs/processing fee required to deliver your new pet. But there was never any pet, both the "breeder" and the "shipper" are scammers, typically operating out of Africa. These sites are rampant and account for a large percentage of online pet seller websites - they typically have a similar layout/template (screenshot - example)
If you are considering buying a pet online, some easy things to check are: (1) The registration date of the domain (if it was created recently it is likely a scam website) (2) Reverse image search the pictures of available pets - you will usually find other scam websites using the same photos. (3) Copy a sentence/section of the text from the "about us" page and put it into google (in quotes) - these scammers often copy large parts of their website's text from other places. (4) Search for the domain name and look for entries on petscams.com or other scam-tracking sites. (5) Strongly consider buying/adopting your pet from a local shelter or breeder where you can see the animal in person before putting any money down.
Thanks to djscsi for this entry.
Fake shipping company scams
These scams usually start when you try to buy something illegal online. You will be scammed for the initial payment, and then you will receive an email from the fake shipping company telling you that you need to pay them some sort of fee or bribe. If you pay this, they will keep trying to scam you with increasingly absurd stories until you stop paying, at which point they will blackmail you. If you are involved in this scam, all you can do is ignore the scammers and move on, and try to dispute your payments if possible.
Chinese Upwork scam
Someone will ask you to create an Upwork or other freelancer site account for them and will offer money in return. You will not be paid, and they want to use the accounts to scam people.
Quickbooks invoice scam
This is a fake check style scam that takes advantage of Quickbooks.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Digit wallet scam
A variation of the fake check scam, the scammer sends you money through a digital wallet (i.e. Venmo, Apple Pay, Zelle, Cash App) along with a message claiming they've sent the money to the wrong person and a request to send the money back. Customer service for these digital wallets may even suggest that you send the money back. However, the money sent is from a stolen credit card and will be removed from your account after a few days. Your transfer is not reversed since it came from your own funds.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

What nobody usually mentions about Bitcoin.

At current prices almost $13,000,000 of new bitcoins are mined every day. That almost $5 billion a year. These have to be absorbed constantly just to keep the price stable.
When the price drops like to 6500 or really any price, I think about all the new money needed to absorb the supply. I am always amazed it doesn’t drop more. From time to time I buy a little more when prices drop.
The halving will cut the current 1800 new bitcoins a day to 900. If the price goes to $20,000 that will be $18,000,000 a day after halving.
My point is this. I have no idea what price bitcoin will be next year or even in a few years. But I am exceedingly confident in the long term and every time the price drops but doesn’t continue to drop, it makes me realize just how strong bitcoin is, even with 1800 new bitcoins every day.
submitted by foomev2 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How sustainable is this Defi and Ethereum rally?

As I understand, these yield farming tokens are hyper inflationary by design, and I'm generally curious on how price performs when selling starts. My assessment is that many of these tokens can lose 90 percent of their value in seconds if just a few people sold.
And Ethereum itself has benefited greatly from this yield farming frenzy. Most of us believe bitcoin will eventually see much higher prices of the coming years. Most people advocate Ethereum is a great long term investment in line with bitcoin, but I see the opposite. Ethereum is just the platform for pump and dumps, and therefore Ethereum is just a higher cap pump and dump coin. Ethereum is the admission ticket needed to get into pump and dumps, and when that pump and dump energy is gone, so is the demand for Ethereum.
Everyone is going into alt coins with dreams of becoming overnight millionaires, but I yet have seen an altcoin that doesnt just act like a pump and dump. Bitcoin had had a 60% correction from 19k to 3.1k, but most of these alts had 99% correction. In general I think the idea that altcoins must outperform bitcoin is a myth. Institutions are interested in bitcoin because of the disinflationary nature and the large following. Institutions are not interested in Sushi or Chainlink. Shitcoins are just pyramid schemes and traps set by whales to fuck over retail investors.
submitted by ShotBot to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

How much longer before the get-rich-quick types walk away from this mess?

I thought 2 years would do it given the impatience of this crowd but I was wrong. How much more time would you give before they start leaving in droves? Maybe another 2-3 years then?
submitted by javascript_dev to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

The PUMP's only just started and already Coiners are dreaming of MOON and Revenge: "If Bitcoin hits $100K, I think I care less about being rich than I do about rubbing it in everyones face that kept calling it a scam."

submitted by Crypto_To_The_Core to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Idea | Tip Nano to creators

Hey guys, my name is Tolik and I'm new to Nano.
I would like to tell you a bit about myself, and then about some ideas that I would like to share with you :)
I'm a content creator form Israel, and I have about 65k subscribers over my 3 channels. I'm also the first Israeli partnered on Twitch and been doing that for 8 years now.
Had a lot of fun with it for the first few years, playing my favorite games and earning good money, and eventually burning out hating the game that got me all my following. Our (Israeli) community exploded on youtube, but to make the most of it you need to make mindless trendy content, playing trendy and pretty childish games. I did that for a while, but it was too hard for my mind and I ended up burning out hard stepping away for a long while.
Back in 2013 I first stumbled upon the world of crypto and realized the potential of the blockchain and the implementation of that technology in our world. Not enough to buy enough to get rich, but I never even considered that it could get to the volumes it got to now. In 2017 when it exploded, I realized I had some leftover coins from 2013-14 and cashed out a few thousand dollars, with the pain it could have been millions if I was a little more aware. Oh Well.
A few years ago, I got into the world of self-development and got a new perspective on life. Doing only what I love and grooming a small but good community on youtube, not caring about trends, views, and money in my pocket.
A few days ago, a colleague of mine started to promote some unknown coin to his child viewers, basically, the premise is a coin that you could mine on your phone. Immediately I had some red flags popping off my mind, especially because he promoted some shady CSGO gambling sites that I didn't even want to look into. He of course had his promotion code for registering to the gambling site, and using the mentioned crypto (downloading the app).
If you can mine it on your phone, what would stop you using an expensive setup and just dominate the market? The fact that he advertised it as a get rich scheme, and the fact that it's a referral pyramid network, does not seem safe.
After looking into it I did not see any promise, especially after I found so many altcoins with big communities that his crypto didn't have, information that did not add up, and a bunch of weird stuff going on.
Because I started researching the crypto world (after so many years not being aware of what happened to it), youtube started suggesting me videos about it, one of them was u/SonderDev 's nanoPaint (Sorry I made SpongeBobs eye red) and started doing some research on nano and the technology. For 3 days I devoured all the info I can, reading most of the posts here on reddit, and joining on Discord and TG. I again felt that butterfly feeling in my gut, the one I felt so many years ago when I found out about bitcoin (and some other rare occasions). So much potential, and I kind of feel I am already late to the party, and yet, my mind can't stop thinking about what is possible.
Now to the good stuff! Donations(tips) to streamers and content creators were always a huge part of our revenue. But we had a lot of problems with it - High fees, making small donations pretty much impossible, and the fear of someone charging you back and having you pay the fees for every donation that got charged back. I had someone give me about $2k for the span of two months with small donations, ended up charging all that money back, and having me pay $10 for each of his donations, even if they were under that amount. PayPal is pretty crazy.
Also, If you consider something like Patreon (a monthly donation for a project or a creator you like for benefits) they also charge extra for their fee, and people can still charge you back, even though they will handle it, you still give them the benefits. Twitch takes a huge cut for subscribers (user pays $4.99 and I get as little as $1.70) and youtube are getting about 30% for their cut.
See where I'm going with this? As proof of concept, a simple donation website/app could be made. You send the creator any amount of nano, it pops up on the screen for everyone to see. People would love the idea to impact the stream with as little money the creator allows. That would start up a conversation, people would start seeing the technology in action, how fast and feeless everything is going.
Not to mention an integrated service could be made that is similar to delegate.it (allows users to do tasks for nano/fiat) in this instance, the tasks could be - follow the creator on Twitter, Instagram, like his posts and whatever else he decides, and it could be cheap, because people would be doing it to pop up on stream and help the creator, not for the actual fiat amount of the nano given. killing 3 birds with one stone. Promoting nano, allowing everybody a voice to a degree they choose, and promoting himself to his viewers.
If this works, we could either go to one of the 2 biggest platforms (StreamLabs and StreamElements (who are Israeli and I know the 2 founders personally)) and they would integrate it to their already build system, or develop something to solely promote nano. We could reach out to smaller streamers that have small dedicated communities, not many donations and revenue coming in and allow them to use our system to promote their content and interact with their viewers.
A few more ideas I have in mind for a project like that:
For the donations (tips)
• Having different donation alerts for different QR codes that you scan. Similarly to what NanoPaint accomplishes, we could have a different QR code to scan for an alert that the user chooses to show up.
• Coloring the Camera frame - similarly to NanoPaint, drawing pixels on the frame of the camera of the streamer, changing it in real-time for nano.
• Having text to speech for the alert
• Have your donation impact the streamer in AR (putting something on his face or head).
Crowd Funding
• Donation goal that will make a purchase only if it gets there - setting up an X day goal to buy a new GPU for example, and having people contribute to it, and if it's reached, it automatically makes the order from amazon or wherever (having the data safe with our service), and if it's not - fully refunding the users. It could be a daily goal for pizza or whatever they choose. It will allow integration with businesses that would work with us.
• Stream goals - if we get to X Nano this stream, 24 hour stream tomorrow! If we won't, get your nano back! Would encourage people to participate even if they are not sure the goal will be met, have the assurance that the full amount would be refunded if it did not get there.
• Challenges - starting a bounty challenge, for example, have an Ace in CSGO (kill all 5 enemies) and get X amount of nano. If you didn't, money goes back. the crowd could vote on it having more interaction and validating if the challenge is complete.
Voting
• Have people engage with polls in real-time with nano, could scan their option to vote, and even get refunded if their option did not win, encouraging them to vote for their favorite option, even if it seems unlikely to win.
User Battles
• Having people start a challenge of a game, in an app or on the web, or perhaps even something random like gambling, and having it appear on stream for everybody to witness. Maybe even challenging the streamer for a nano incentive or someone else who watches.
Chat
• Having an on-screen chat that changes the colors and design of the people who donated with nano, and linked their account. more incentive to donate.
Stream Sponsors
• Having a rotating banner on-screen at all times, allowing users to pay nano to show their banner. As an auction or a price set from the creator.
Most of these ideas occurred to me as I was writing this post, and I'm sure we could think of better ones with some effort. Some of them are already implemented on the websites that were mention above, however, having the power and speed of the nano is a game-changer IMHO.
So why am I writing this post? First, just to share with you and get to know you better, maybe spark an idea or a motivation for anyone to do something good for nano.
Second, money is tight now, moved back to my parents due to the pandemic, hard to find a decent job as we have more than %20 of the people in Israel looking for a job and as I mentioned before the content I make is not very profitable. I can't afford to invest money in this idea, and I lack the skills to do it myself. So maybe if it's good someone else could.
If, however, someone would be inclined to help make this a reality, I would appreciate any comments, suggestions, investment of time, or money in testing this out. I have a dedicated community with thousands of people that will be aware of nano if we'll do it, years of experience in this field, and not to mention that I'm in good relations with most of the other content creators and platforms here in Israel, and some international.
Discord: ToLy#2657
Feel free to DM me at any time :)
Nice to meet you, and thank you for reading.
submitted by tolikr94 to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

/r/Scams Common Scam Master Post

Hello visitors and subscribers of scams! Here you will find a master list of common (and uncommon) scams that you may encounter online or in real life. Thank you to the many contributors who helped create this thread!

If you know of a scam that is not covered here, write a comment and it will be added to the next edition.

Previous threads: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/search?q=common+scams+master+post&restrict_sr=on
Blackmail email scam thread: https://old.reddit.com/Scams/comments/g8jqnthe_blackmail_email_scam_part_5//
Some of these articles are from small, local publications and refer to the scam happening in a specific area. Do not think that this means that the scam won't happen in your area.

Spoofing

Caller ID spoofing
It is very easy for anyone to make a phone call while having any number show up on the caller ID of the person receiving the phone call. Receiving a phone call from a certain number does not mean that the person/company who owns that number has actually called you.
Email spoofing
The "from" field of an email can be set by the sender, meaning that you can receive scam emails that look like they are from legitimate addresses. It's important to never click links in emails unless absolutely necessary, for example a password reset link you requested or an account activation link for an account you created.
SMS spoofing
SMS messages can be spoofed, so be wary of messages that seem to be from your friends or other trusted people.

The most common scams

The fake check scam (Credit to nimble2 for this part)
The fake check scam arises from many different situations (for instance, you applied for a job, or you are selling something on a place like Craigslist, or someone wants to purchase goods or services from your business, or you were offered a job as a mystery shopper, you were asked to wrap your car with an advertisement, or you received a check in the mail for no reason), but the bottom line is always something like this:
General fraudulent funds scams If somebody is asking you to accept and send out money as a favour or as part of a job, it is a fraudulent funds scam. It does not matter how they pay you, any payment on any service can be fraudulent and will be reversed when it is discovered to be fraudulent.
Phone verification code scams Someone will ask you to receive a verification text and then tell you to give them the code. Usually the code will come from Google Voice, or from Craigslist. In the Google version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Google Voice account that the scammer will use to scam people with. In the Craigslist version of the scam, your phone number will be used to verify a Craigslist posting that the scammer will use to scam people. There is also an account takeover version of this scam that will involve the scammer sending a password reset token to your phone number and asking you for it.
Bitcoin job scams
Bitcoin job scams involve some sort of fraudulent funds transfer, usually a fake check although a fraudulent bank transfer can be used as well. The scammer will send you the fraudulent money and ask you to purchase bitcoins. This is a scam, and you will have zero recourse after you send the scammer bitcoins.
Email flooding
If you suddenly receive hundreds or thousands of spam emails, usually subscription confirmations, it's very likely that one of your online accounts has been taken over and is being used fraudulently. You should check any of your accounts that has a credit card linked to it, preferably from a computer other than the one you normally use. You should change all of your passwords to unique passwords and you should start using two factor authentication everywhere.
Boss/CEO scam A scammer will impersonate your boss or someone who works at your company and will ask you to run an errand for them, which will usually be purchasing gift cards and sending them the code. Once the scammer has the code, you have no recourse.
Employment certification scams
You will receive a job offer that is dependent on you completing a course or receiving a certification from a company the scammer tells you about. The scammer operates both websites and the job does not exist.
Craigslist fake payment scams
Scammers will ask you about your item that you have listed for sale on a site like Craigslist, and will ask to pay you via Paypal. They are scamming you, and the payment in most cases does not actually exist, the email you received was sent by the scammers. In cases where you have received a payment, the scammer can dispute the payment or the payment may be entirely fraudulent. The scammer will then either try to get you to send money to them using the fake funds that they did not send to you, or will ask you to ship the item, usually to a re-shipping facility or a parcel mule.
General fraudulent funds scams The fake check scam is not the only scam that involves accepting fraudulent/fake funds and purchasing items for scammers. If your job or opportunity involves accepting money and then using that money, it is almost certainly a frauduent funds scam. Even if the payment is through a bank transfer, Paypal, Venmo, Zelle, Interac e-Transfer, etc, it does not matter.
Credit card debt scam
Fraudsters will offer to pay off your bills, and will do so with fraudulent funds. Sometimes it will be your credit card bill, but it can be any bill that can be paid online. Once they pay it off, they will ask you to send them money or purchase items for them. The fraudulent transaction will be reversed in the future and you will never be able to keep the money. This scam happens on sites like Craigslist, Twitter, Instagram, and also some dating sites, including SeekingArrangement.
The parcel mule scam
A scammer will contact you with a job opportunity that involves accepting and reshipping packages. The packages are either stolen or fraudulently obtained items, and you will not be paid by the scammer. Here is a news article about a scam victim who fell for this scam and reshipped over 20 packages containing fraudulently acquired goods.
The Skype sex scam
You're on Facebook and you get a friend request from a cute girl you've never met. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. She'll ask you to send pictures or videos or get on webcam where she can see you naked with your face in the picture. The scam: There's no girl. You've sent nudes to a guy pretending to be a girl. As soon as he has the pictures he'll demand money and threaten to send the pictures to your friends and family. Sometimes the scammer will upload the video to a porn site or Youtube to show that they are serious.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: You cannot buy silence, you can only rent it. Paying the blackmailer will show them that the information they have is valuable and they will come after you for more money. Let your friends and family know that you were scammed and tell them to ignore friend requests or messages from people they don't know. Also, make sure your privacy settings are locked down and consider deactivating your account.
The underage girl scam
You're on a dating site or app and you get contacted by a cute girl. She wants to start sexting and trading nudes. Eventually she stops communicating and you get a call from a pissed off guy claiming to be the girl's father, or a police officer, or a private investigator, or something else along those lines. Turns out the girl you were sexting is underage, and her parents want some money for various reasons, such as to pay for a new phone, to pay for therapy, etc. There is, of course, no girl. You were communicating with a scammer.
What to do if you are a victim of this scam: Stop picking up the phone when the scammers call. Do not pay them, or they will be after you for more money.
Phishing
Phishing is when a scammer tries to trick you into giving information to them, such as your password or private financial information. Phishing messages will usually look very similar to official messages, and sometimes they are identical. If you are ever required to login to a different account in order to use a service, you should be incredibly cautious.
The blackmail email scam The exact wording of the emails varies, but there are generally four main parts. They claim to have placed software/malware on a porn/adult video site, they claim to have a video of you masturbating or watching porn, they threaten to release the video to your friends/family/loved ones/boss/dog, and they demand that you pay them in order for them to delete the video. Rest assured that this is a very common spam campaign and there is no truth behind the email or the threats. Here are some news articles about this scam.
The blackmail mail scam
This is very similar to the blackmail email scam, but you will receive a letter in the mail.
Rental scams Usually on local sites like Craigslist, scammers will steal photos from legitimate real estate listings and will list them for rent at or below market rate. They will generally be hesitant to tell you the address of the property for "safety reasons" and you will not be able to see the unit. They will then ask you to pay them a deposit and they claim they will ship you the keys. In reality, your money is gone and you will have no recourse.
Craigslist vehicle scams A scammer will list a vehicle on Craigslist and will offer to ship you the car. In many cases they will also falsely claim to sell you the car through eBay or Amazon. If you are looking for a car on Craigslist and the seller says anything about shipping the car, having an agent, gives you a long story about why they are selling the car, or the listing price is far too low, you are talking to a scammer and you should ignore and move on.
Advance-fee scam, also known as the 419 scam, or the Nigerian prince scam. You will receive a communication from someone who claims that you are entitled to a large sum of money, or you can help them obtain a large sum of money. However, they will need money from you before you receive the large sum.
Man in the middle scams
Man in the middle scams are very common and very hard to detect. The scammer will impersonate a company or person you are legitimately doing business with, and they will ask you to send the money to one of their own bank accounts or one controlled by a money mule. They have gained access to the legitimate persons email address, so there will be nothing suspicious about the email. To prevent this, make contact in a different way that lets you verify that the person you are talking to is the person you think you are talking to.
Cam girl voting/viewer scam
You will encounter a "cam girl" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to go to their site and sign up with your credit card. They may offer a free show, or ask you to vote for them, or any number of other fake stories.
Amateur porn recruitment scam
You will encounter a "pornstar" on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask you to create an adult film with hehim, but first you need to do something. The story here is usually something to do with verifying your age, or you needing to take an STD test that involves sending money to a site operated by the scammer.
Hot girl SMS spam
You receive a text from a random number with a message along the lines of "Hey babe I'm here in town again if you wanted to meet up this time, are you around?" accompanied by a NSFW picture of a hot girl. It's spam, and they'll direct you to their scam website that requires a credit card.
Identity verification scam
You will encounter someone on a dating/messaging/social media/whatever site/app, and the scammer will ask that you verify your identity as they are worried about catfishing. The scammer operates the site, and you are not talking to whoever you think you are talking to.
This type of scam teases you with something, then tries to make you sign up for something else that costs money. The company involved is often innocent, but they turn a blind eye to the practice as it helps their bottom line, even if they have to occasionally issue refunds. A common variation takes place on dating sites/dating apps, where you will match with someone who claims to be a camgirl who wants you to sign up for a site and vote for her. Another variation takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where the scammers setup fake rental scams and demand that you go through a specific service for a credit check. Once you go through with it, the scammer will stop talking to you. Another variation also takes place on local sites like Craigslist, where scammers will contact you while you are selling a car and will ask you to purchase a Carfax-like report from a specific website.
Multi Level Marketing or Affiliate Marketing
You apply for a vague job listing for 'sales' on craigslist. Or maybe an old friend from high school adds you on Facebook and says they have an amazing business opportunity for you. Or maybe the well dressed guy who's always interviewing people in the Starbucks that you work at asks if you really want to be slinging coffee the rest of your life. The scam: MLMs are little more than pyramid schemes. They involve buying some sort of product (usually snake oil health products like body wraps or supplements) and shilling them to your friends and family. They claim that the really money is recruiting people underneath you who give you a slice of whatever they sell. And if those people underneath you recruit more people, you get a piece of their sales. Ideally if you big enough pyramid underneath you the money will roll in without any work on your part. Failure to see any profit will be your fault for not "wanting it enough." The companies will claim that you need to buy their extra training modules or webinars to really start selling. But in reality, the vast majority of people who buy into a MLM won't see a cent. At the end of the day all you'll be doing is annoying your friends and family with your constant recruitment efforts. What to look out for: Recruiters love to be vague. They won't tell you the name of the company or what exactly the job will entail. They'll pump you up with promises of "self-generating income", "being your own boss", and "owning your own company." They might ask you to read books about success and entrepreneurs. They're hoping you buy into the dream first. If you get approached via social media, check their timelines. MLMs will often instruct their victims to pretend that they've already made it. They'll constantly post about how they're hustling and making the big bucks and linking to youtube videos about success. Again, all very vague about what their job actually entails. If you think you're being recruited: Ask them what exactly the job is. If they can't answer its probably a MLM. Just walk away.

Phone scams

You should generally avoid answering or engaging with random phone calls. Picking up and engaging with a scam call tells the scammers that your phone number is active, and will usually lead to more calls.
Tax Call
You get a call from somebody claiming to be from your countries tax agency. They say you have unpaid taxes that need to be paid immediately, and you may be arrested or have other legal action taken against you if it is not paid. This scam has caused the American IRS, Canadian CRA, British HMRC, and Australian Tax Office to issue warnings. This scam happens in a wide variety of countries all over the world.
Warrant Call
Very similar to the tax call. You'll get a phone call from an "agent", "officer", "sheriff", or other law enforcement officer claiming that there is a warrant out for your arrest and you will be arrested very soon. They will then offer to settle everything for a fee, usually paid in giftcards.
[Legal Documents/Process Server Calls]
Very similar to the warrant call. You'll get a phone call from a scammer claiming that they are going to serve you legal documents, and they will threaten you with legal consequences if you refuse to comply. They may call themselves "investigators", and will sometimes give you a fake case number.
Student Loan Forgiveness Scam
Scammers will call you and tell you about a student loan forgiveness program, but they are interested in obtaining private information about you or demanding money in order to join the fake program.
Tech Support Call You receive a call from someone with a heavy accent claiming to be a technician Microsoft or your ISP. They inform you that your PC has a virus and your online banking and other accounts may be compromised if the virus is not removed. They'll have you type in commands and view diagnostics on your PC which shows proof of the virus. Then they'll have you install remote support software so the technician can work on your PC, remove the virus, and install security software. The cost of the labor and software can be hundreds of dollars. The scam: There's no virus. The technician isn't a technician and does not work for Microsoft or your ISP. Scammers (primarily out of India) use autodialers to cold-call everyone in the US. Any file they point out to you or command they have you run is completely benign. The software they sell you is either freeware or ineffective. What to do you if you're involved with this scam: If the scammers are remotely on your computer as you read this, turn off your PC or laptop via the power button immediately, and then if possible unplug your internet connection. Some of the more vindictive tech scammers have been known to create boot passwords on your computer if they think you've become wise to them and aren't going to pay up. Hang up on the scammers, block the number, and ignore any threats about payment. Performing a system restore on your PC is usually all that is required to remove the scammer's common remote access software. Reports of identity theft from fake tech calls are uncommon, but it would still be a good idea to change your passwords for online banking and monitor your accounts for any possible fraud. How to avoid: Ignore any calls claiming that your PC has a virus. Microsoft will never contact you. If you're unsure if a call claiming to be from your ISP is legit, hang up, and then dial the customer support number listed on a recent bill. If you have elderly relatives or family that isn't tech savvy, take the time to fill them in on this scam.
Chinese government scam
This scam is aimed at Chinese people living in Europe and North America, and involves a voicemail from someone claiming to be associated with the Chinese government, usually through the Chinese consulate/embassy, who is threatening legal action or making general threats.
Chinese shipping scam
This scam is similar to the Chinese government scam, but involves a seized/suspicious package, and the scammers will connect the victim to other scammers posing as Chinese government investigators.
Social security suspension scam
You will receive a call from someone claiming to work for the government regarding suspicious activity, fraud, or serious crimes connected to your social security number. You'll be asked to speak to an operator and the operator will explain the steps you need to follow in order to fix the problems. It's all a scam, and will lead to you losing money and could lead to identity theft if you give them private financial information.
Utilities cutoff
You get a call from someone who claims that they are from your utility company, and they claim that your utilities will be shut off unless you immediately pay. The scammer will usually ask for payment via gift cards, although they may ask for payment in other ways, such as Western Union or bitcoin.
Relative in custody Scammer claims to be the police, and they have your son/daughtenephew/estranged twin in custody. You need to post bail (for some reason in iTunes gift cards or MoneyGram) immediately or the consequences will never be the same.
Mexican family scam
This scam comes in many different flavours, but always involves someone in your family and Mexico. Sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been detained, sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member has been kidnapped, and sometimes the scammer will claim that your family member is injured and needs help.
General family scams
Scammers will gather a large amount of information about you and target your family members using different stories with the goal of gettimg them to send money.
One ring scam
Scammers will call you from an international number with the goal of getting you to return their call, causing you to incur expensive calling fees.

Online shopping scams

THE GOLDEN RULE OF ONLINE SHOPPING: If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Dropshipping
An ad on reddit or social media sites like Facebook and Instagram offers items at huge discounts or even free (sometimes requiring you to reblog or like their page). They just ask you to pay shipping. The scam: The item will turn out to be very low quality and will take weeks or even months to arrive. Sometimes the item never arrives, and the store disappears or stops responding. The seller drop-ships the item from China. The item may only cost a few dollars, and the Chinese government actually pays for the shipping. You end up paying $10-$15 dollars for a $4 item, with the scammer keeping the profit. If you find one of these scams but really have your heart set on the item, you can find it on AliExpress or another Chinese retailer.
Influencer scams
A user will reach out to you on a social media platform, usually Instagram, and offer you the chance to partner with them and receive a free/discounted product, as long as you pay shipping. This is a different version of the dropshipping scam, and is just a marketing technique to get you to buy their products.
Triangulation fraud
Triangulation fraud occurs when you make a purchase on a site like Amazon or eBay for an item at a lower than market price, and receive an item that was clearly purchased new at full price. The scammer uses a stolen credit card to order your item, while the money from the listing is almost all profit for the scammer.
Instagram influencer scams
Someone will message you on Instagram asking you to promote their products, and offering you a discount code. The items are Chinese junk, and the offer is made to many people at a time.
Cheap Items
Many websites pop up and offer expensive products, including electronics, clothes, watches, sunglasses, and shoes at very low prices. The scam: Some sites are selling cheap knock-offs. Some will just take your money and run. What to do if you think you're involved with this scam: Contact your bank or credit card and dispute the charge. How to avoid: The sites often have every brand-name shoe or fashion item (Air Jordan, Yeezy, Gucci, etc) in stock and often at a discounted price. The site will claim to be an outlet for a major brand or even a specific line or item. The site will have images at the bottom claiming to be Secured by Norton or various official payment processors but not actual links. The site will have poor grammar and a mish-mash of categories. Recently, established websites will get hacked or their domain name jacked and turned into scam stores, meaning the domain name of the store will be completely unrelated to the items they're selling. If the deal sounds too good to be true it probably is. Nobody is offering brand new iPhones or Beats or Nintendo Switches for 75% off.
Cheap Amazon 3rd Party Items
You're on Amazon or maybe just Googling for an item and you see it for an unbelievable price from a third-party seller. You know Amazon has your back so you order it. The scam: One of three things usually happen: 1) The seller marks the items as shipped and sends a fake tracking number. Amazon releases the funds to the seller, and the seller disappears. Amazon ultimately refunds your money. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to re-order the item directly from their website, usually with the guarantee that the order is still protected by Amazon. The seller takes your money and runs. Amazon informs you that they do not offer protection on items sold outside of Amazon and cannot help you. 2) The seller immediately cancels the order and instructs you to instead send payment via an unused Amazon gift card by sending the code on the back via email. Once the seller uses the code, the money on the card is gone and cannot be refunded. How to avoid: These scammers can be identified by looking at their Amazon storefronts. They'll be brand new sellers offering a wide range of items at unbelievable prices. Usually their Amazon names will be gibberish, or a variation on FIRSTNAME.LASTNAME. Occasionally however, established storefronts will be hacked. If the deal is too good to be true its most likely a scam.
Scams on eBay
There are scams on eBay targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who privately message you regarding the order, especially if they ask you to ship to a different address or ask to negotiate via text/email/a messaging service. As a buyer you should look out for new accounts selling in-demand items, established accounts selling in-demand items that they have no previous connection to (you can check their feedback history for a general idea of what they bought/sold in the past), and lookout for people who ask you to go off eBay and use another service to complete the transaction. In many cases you will receive a fake tracking number and your money will be help up for up to a month.
Scams on Amazon
There are scams on Amazon targeting both buyers and sellers. As a seller, you should look out for people who message you about a listing. As a buyer you should look out for listings that have an email address for you to contact the person to complete the transaction, and you should look out for cheap listings of in-demand items.
Scams on Reddit
Reddit accounts are frequently purchased and sold by fraudsters who wish to use the high karma count + the age of the account to scam people on buy/sell subreddits. You need to take precautions and be safe whenever you are making a transaction online.
Computer scams
Virus scam
A popup or other ad will say that you have a virus and you need to follow their advice in order to remove it. They are lying, and either want you to install malware or pay for their software.

Assorted scams

Chinese Brushing / direct shipping
If you have ever received an unsolicited small package from China, your address was used to brush. Vendors place fake orders for their own products and send out the orders so that they can increase their ratings.
Money flipping
Scammer claims to be a banking insider who can double/triple/bazoople any amount of money you send them, with no consequences of any kind. Obviously, the money disappears into their wallet the moment you send it.

Door to door scams

As a general rule, you should not engage with door to door salesmen. If you are interested in the product they are selling, check online first.
Selling Magazines
Someone or a group will come to your door and offer to sell a magazine subscription. Often the subscriptions are not for the duration or price you were told, and the magazines will often have tough or impossible cancellation policies.
Energy sales
Somebody will come to your door claiming to be from an energy company. They will ask to see your current energy bill so that they can see how much you pay. They will then offer you a discount if you sign up with them, and promise to handle everything with your old provider. Some of these scammers will "slam" you, by using your account number that they saw on your bill to switch you to their service without authorization, and some will scam you by charging higher prices than the ones you agreed on.
Security system scams
Scammers will come to your door and ask about your security system, and offer to sell you a new one. These scammers are either selling you overpriced low quality products, or are casing your home for a future burglary.
They ask to enter your home
While trying to sell you whatever, they suddenly need to use your bathroom, or they've been writing against the wall and ask to use your table instead. Or maybe they just moved into the neighborhood and want to see how you decorate for ideas.
They're scoping out you and your place. They want to see what valuables you have, how gullible you are, if you have a security system or dogs, etc.

Street scams

Begging With a Purpose
"I just need a few more dollars for the bus," at the bus station, or "I just need $5 to get some gas," at a gas station. There's also a variation where you will be presented with a reward: "I just need money for a cab to get uptown, but I'll give you sports tickets/money/a date/a priceless vase."
Three Card Monte, Also Known As The Shell Game
Unbeatable. The people you see winning are in on the scam.
Drop and Break
You bump into someone and they drop their phone/glasses/fancy bottle of wine/priceless vase and demand you pay them back. In reality, it's a $2 pair of reading glasses/bottle of three-buck-chuck/tasteful but affordable vase.
CD Sales
You're handed a free CD so you can check out the artist's music. They then ask for your name and immediately write it on the CD. Once they've signed your name, they ask you for money, saying they can't give it to someone else now. Often they use dry erase markers, or cheap CD sleeves. Never use any type of storage device given to you by a random person, as the device can contain malware.
White Van Speaker Scam
You're approached and offered speakers/leather jackets/other luxury goods at a discount. The scammer will have an excuse as to why the price is so low. After you buy them, you'll discover that they are worthless.
iPhone Street Sale
You're approached and shown an iPhone for sale, coming in the box, but it's open and you can see the phone. If you buy the phone, you'll get an iPhone box with no iPhone, just some stones or cheap metal in it to weigh it down.
Buddhist Monk Pendant
A monk in traditional garb approaches you, hands you a gold trinket, and asks for a donation. He holds either a notebook with names and amounts of donation (usually everyone else has donated $5+), or a leaflet with generic info. This is fairly common in NYC, and these guys get aggressive quickly.
Friendship Bracelet Scam More common in western Europe, you're approached by someone selling bracelets. They quickly wrap a loop of fabric around your finger and pull it tight, starting to quickly weave a bracelet. The only way to (easily) get it off your hand is to pay. Leftover sales
This scam involves many different items, but the idea is usually the same: you are approached by someone who claims to have a large amount of excess inventory and offers to sell it to you at a great price. The scammer actually has low quality items and will lie to you about the price/origin of the items.
Dent repair scams
Scammers will approach you in public about a dent in your car and offer to fix it for a low price. Often they will claim that they are mechanics. They will not fix the dent in your car, but they will apply large amounts of wax or other substances to hide the dent while they claim that the substance requires time to harden.
Gold ring/jewelry/valuable item scam
A scammer will "find" a gold ring or other valuable item and offers to sell it to you. The item is fake and you will never see the scammer again.
Distraction theft
One person will approach you and distract you, while their accomplice picks your pockets. The distraction can take many forms, but if you are a tourist and are approached in public, watch closely for people getting close to you.

General resources

Site to report scams in the United Kingdom: http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/
Site to report scams in the United States: https://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx
Site to report scams in Canada: www.antifraudcentre-centreantifraude.ca/reportincident-signalerincident/index-eng.htm
Site to report scams in Europe: https://www.europol.europa.eu/report-a-crime/report-cybercrime-online
FTC scam alerts: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts
Microsoft's anti-scam guide: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/safety/online-privacy/avoid-phone-scams.aspx
https://www.usa.gov/common-scams-frauds
https://www.usa.gov/scams-and-frauds
https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts
https://www.fbi.gov/scams-and-safety/common-fraud-schemes
submitted by EugeneBYMCMB to Scams [link] [comments]

They all laughed when I drank. Yeah jokes on you, assholes. I'm up 4 grand leedle leedle leedle.

They all laughed when I drank. Yeah jokes on you, assholes. I'm up 4 grand leedle leedle leedle. submitted by JohnnyFlawless to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

It really do be like that sometimes:

It really do be like that sometimes: submitted by BobbyRye to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Money man says bitcoin could be a pyramid scheme - YouTube The Rise and Fall of a Crypto Pyramid Scheme: How to Spot a Scam BREAKING: Roger Ver says Bitcoin is a Pyramid Scheme. Federal Reserve to Tokenize the US Dollar!?! TradeShark - The Latest Bitcoin Pyramid Scheme - YouTube Nasgo Is The Next Bitconnect Pyramid Scheme

Lending Tree Chier Economist, Tendayi Kapfidze recently commented on Bitcoin, calling it a pyramid scheme, so here is why his view may be wrong. Over the course of the last 11 years, Bitcoin has traveled a long way for an unknown new invention to the largest cryptocurrency in the world, with a market cap of $130 billion. LendingTree Chief Economist Tendayi Kapfidze told reporters at Yahoo Finance January 1st that Bitcoin is “a pyramid scheme” and a scam with no particular utility. Kapfidze made the comments just after co-panelist Oliver Pursche, Chief Market Strategist at Bruderman Asset Management, described his own cryptocurrency investments and said, “(T)here’s something here. One of the leading financial media outlets just called Bitcoin a grand pyramid scheme. It doesn’t come as a surprise as it’s common among mainstream media outlets to sensationalize news to gain more readership. Bitcoin is an ideal topic to do just that. The increasing Bitcoin price in the recent days has pushed the popular cryptocurrency into the limelight. As the cryptocurrency’s price ... If that pyramid scheme collapses, she suggested, ETH’s price could slump. This is similar to what happened with Ethereum’s price and PlusToken. Ethereum’s Price Action Is Being Dictated by a Pyramid Scheme: Investor. According to Dovey Wan, a founding partner at Primitive Capital, Ethereum’s price action is likely being dictated by a ... It looks like a Ponzi scheme or a pyramid scheme. If I buy bitcoin today, it will be more valuable tomorrow because others have bought it at a higher price. As an existing “investor,” I am benefitting from others getting in. Meanwhile, what I’m actually owning is a bitcoin. Don’t get me wrong, bitcoin is valuable, but it’s not worth $10,000 per coin, or even $1,000 per coin. It’s a ...

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Money man says bitcoin could be a pyramid scheme - YouTube

බිට් කොයින් පිරමිඩ් ස්කීම් එකක්ද? Is Bitcoin a Pyramid Scheme? https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/create ... Perhaps the largest Bitcoin pyramid scheme out there, BitConnect, has collapsed. In this video, we talk about why schemes like BitConnect are mathematically impossible and look at some of the ... Bitcoin pyramid scheme, bitcoin peter schiff, bitcoin peter schiff opinion, bitcoin prediction in 2020, bitcoin prediction, bitcoin price in 2020, bitcoin price news, bitcoin news in 2020, btc ... Close. This video is unavailable. Instagram Live

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